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Category Archives: projects

“Pink and Blue”
2018
Richard Telles Gallery

Pink and Blue is based on a small collage from a recent series of collages. The series is comprised of small black and white portraits that are sliced into narrow vertical or horizontal strips and then slightly rearranged so that the image is out of order but still recognizable. This reference to, or activation of facial recognition has to do with a number of considerations. William Burroughs talked about his “cut-up” technique as a way to open up language from the present and its controlling structure, and release it into the future where new associations would be present. I am interested in opening up images of these individuals, evoking the past with some familiarity, but also the present. Somewhere between recognition and an image out of order, a glitch, or an arbitrary gesture allowing noise to enter into the image. These rearranged images are collaged on a field of color that both frames and isolates them in space. Here the face functions as a site, a relay, not only to the work, writing, voice, compositions, the labor of the subject, but also to the cultural context of their contributions.

This particular installation Pink and Blue, is based on a small collage I had previously made using a 1970’s image of Angela Davis. Her pose and gesture is contemplative with her head resting on her folded arm. She looks away from the camera. This image evokes the past predominantly because of Davis’s natural Afro, which at the time was a powerful political expression of black solidarity in the face of intense racism and oppression. This was also a time when Angela Davis was in the media for her involvement with the Soledad prison controversy, the Black Panthers, and her image had become an icon of black power and resistance. Davis was a student of Herbert Marcuse at Brandeis, and was her mentor at the University of California at San Diego.

I am interested in how the ghosting of the past is present and how this Hauntological position suggests that the past is very present today. This reordered image of Angela Davis is floating in a large field of pink color on the wall. The original collage that this is based on is also pink, and was chosen more or less arbitrarily at the time. But the pink evokes a special shade and brand of pink color known as Baker-Miller Pink, developed in the 1970’s. Baker-Miller Pink is claimed to reduce hostile, violent or aggressive behavior. The color is also known as Schauss pink. Alexander Schauss did extensive research into the effects of the color on emotions at the Naval Correctional Facility in Seattle, and named it after the institute directors, Baker and Miller. The use of this color reflects the subliminal mechanisms of control and oppression that were prevalent in the 1970’s, and to the present. In this window installation, the original collage has been recreated at a visibly public scale that is visible from the space of the street and passersby. Functioning as a remixed sign, Pink and Blue, an homage to Angela Davis, is a Hauntological site that is revisiting a moment of cultural history while activating our collective amnesia.






2017
for Michael Smith’s Not Quite Under_Ground Tattoo Studio
Skulptur Projekte Münster

This ear drawing references two sound artists. One is Max Neuhaus who did a project in New York City in the 1970’s called LISTEN where he would offer guided tours of NY based on the sounds of the city. The other is the composer Pauline Oliveros who developed a theory of Deep Listening. Both of these ideas extend John Cage’s idea of Silence and listening. This simple sign of an ear as a tattoo, offers one an opportunity to add a symbolic sensory device to your body and to demonstrate that you are a deep listener and appreciate the sounds of the world.

Not Quite Under_Ground aspires to bring together communities young and old, and by targeting a clientele 65 years and up (who can get inked for free, or at least at a drastically reduced rate).

Skulptur Projekte Münster

LISTEN

The title of this work, Gate, refers to a movable barrier, a closing or an opening in a fence, wall, or other enclosure, an opening permitting passage through. William Burroughs refers to language as a mechanism of control, an enclosure, and he used the cut-up technique to open it, to break through it. It allowed him to enter into the text, and access language beyond to an alternate world. Gate physically and sonically references a William Burroughs cut-up text collage. He further cut up this particular text with a line drawing, fragmenting the text even further. Gate is based on this drawing, using it as a plan for the sculpture, which is connected to the wall of the gallery at a right angle. The transcribed text was processed using a digital voice program. The computerized reading pronounces the words, but also sometimes pronounces single letters or just punctuation, depending on the way this cut-up was originally created.

Listen to the sound component on Soundcloud.

 

MORE LIGHT
September 9 – October 29, 2017
Curated by Gladys-Katherina Hernando
JOAN is a Los Angeles-based nonprofit space for exhibitions, performances, and screenings. http://joanlosangeles.org/about/

Loren Abbate
C.P. Badger
Michael Carter
Manny Castro
Michael Genovese
Marcos Lutyens
Adam D. Miller
Christina Ondrus
Ali Prosch
David Schafer
Katie Shapiro
Astri Swendsrud
Mungo Thompson
Landon Wiggs

WYBCX Yale Radio
Listen online here.

Solo show and live performance at Samuel Freeman Gallery, Los Angeles CA.

The installation included “Four Letters to Mahler” and “DSENOISE” box set installation. Performances the night of the opening included DSE, David Galbraith, and Dewey Ambrosino with Jacqueline Gordon. Samuel Freeman Gallery is host to three simultaneous solo shows of sound and sculptural installation by David Schafer, David Galbraith, and a collaboration by Dewey Ambrosino & Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon.

http://samuelfreeman.com/exhibitions/ambrosino-galbraith-gordon-schafer/

Performance Photo Credit Steven Hall.

4 letterscardfinalSAMFREEMAN2 copy

Live, unmastered recording: 

Glendale College Art Gallery
Glendale, California
March 10th – April 28th, 2012

“What Should an Astronaut Painter Do?” includes two sculptures that have accompanying sound with text and graphic work. Each sculpture has to do with a male figure of history, the astronaut Buzz Aldrin, and the painter Barnett Newman, both from the late 60’s. The space of the gallery becomes a walk in sound collage with both sculptures’ activating the gallery with sounds emitting and overlapping. Newman and Aldrin talking over each other about their challenges, successes, and doubts.

The desert, according to the British architecture and design theorist Reyner Bahham from the late 60’s, “…is a projection surface positioning the body as a spatialization frame”, referring to the Mojave desert in CA as a true frontier. The desert has been portrayed in hundreds of Western films including films by directors John Ford and John Huston, and in such films including Michelangelo Antonioni’s Zabriskie Point.

BODYPOINT references the desert and cinema utilizing colored panels and sound that frames the “whole-body” as a critical reconsidering of the experience of sheer space. It incorporates three elements, a soundtrack, poster, and a tinted window. The looped sound component is a textural soundscape used as a soundtrack and played continuously through a freestanding PA speaker mounted on a tripod.

 

Bodypoint Soundtrack Excerpt

“Roundabout/UEBA”, a solo exhibition at STUDIO10 Gallery, Bushwick, NY, February 3-28 2012.

The exhibition Roundabout/UEBA includes two metal sculptures with accompanying sound, photography, 3d animation video, and drawings. The sculptures perform as an installation in the gallery space that allows the simultaneous sound from both sculptures to sonically blend together.

“Roundabout” incorporates the translation of data and space into abstract sound. It is comprised of a steel sculpture with an iPod mounted to it. The iPod presents a 3D animation of the same sculpture rotating from two different views at two speeds with accompanying sound. The sound from the animation is generated from uploading the elevation graphics of the sculpture to a software program that converts visual data to sound.

“UEBA” presents the idea of promise with the possibility of failure. A PA speaker mounted to the small aluminum sculpture plays an 11-disc audio book “Magnificent Desolation” by Buzz Aldrin. The disks may be played in any order or repeated as desired.  Accompanying the sculpture and audio are three portraits of Aldrin.

Werk.by is an online critical discussion forum for invited and subscribed artists,created by Andy Alexander for his exhibition at Glendale College Art Gallery. December 2011-January 2012

The discussion forum continues to be active after the show has ended.

Andy Alexander – Werk.by

Floating Points: Volume (IV) with David Schafer

Collaboration with Stephan Moore of the Issue Project Room and Volume (IV), an improvising quartet featuring electroacoustic harpist Shelley Burgon, turntablist Maria Chavez, laptop artist Stephan Moore and electroacoustic flautist Suzanne Thorpe. A space-frame structure was built, utilizing modular scaffolding, in the center of the performance space that the musicians performed inside of. The multi-channel speaker system was mounted to the outside of the frames and the entire structure/event was seen as a sculpture sited within the venue.