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Category Archives: projects

The title of this work, Gate, refers to a movable barrier, a closing or an opening in a fence, wall, or other enclosure, an opening permitting passage through. William Burroughs refers to language as a mechanism of control, an enclosure, and he used the cut-up technique to open it, to break through it. It allowed him to enter into the text, and access language beyond to an alternate world. Gate physically and sonically references a William Burroughs cut-up text collage. He further cut up this particular text with a line drawing, fragmenting the text even further. Gate is based on this drawing, using it as a plan for the sculpture, which is connected to the wall of the gallery at a right angle. The transcribed text was processed using a digital voice program. The computerized reading pronounces the words, but also sometimes pronounces single letters or just punctuation, depending on the way this cut-up was originally created.

Listen to the sound component on Soundcloud.

 

MORE LIGHT
September 9 – October 29, 2017
Curated by Gladys-Katherina Hernando
JOAN is a Los Angeles-based nonprofit space for exhibitions, performances, and screenings. http://joanlosangeles.org/about/

Loren Abbate
C.P. Badger
Michael Carter
Manny Castro
Michael Genovese
Marcos Lutyens
Adam D. Miller
Christina Ondrus
Ali Prosch
David Schafer
Katie Shapiro
Astri Swendsrud
Mungo Thompson
Landon Wiggs

WYBCX Yale Radio
Listen online here.

Solo show and live performance at Samuel Freeman Gallery, Los Angeles CA.

The installation included “Four Letters to Mahler” and “DSENOISE” box set installation. Performances the night of the opening included DSE, David Galbraith, and Dewey Ambrosino with Jacqueline Gordon. Samuel Freeman Gallery is host to three simultaneous solo shows of sound and sculptural installation by David Schafer, David Galbraith, and a collaboration by Dewey Ambrosino & Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon.

http://samuelfreeman.com/exhibitions/ambrosino-galbraith-gordon-schafer/

Performance Photo Credit Steven Hall.

4 letterscardfinalSAMFREEMAN2 copy

Live, unmastered recording: 

Glendale College Art Gallery
Glendale, California
March 10th – April 28th, 2012

“What Should an Astronaut Painter Do?” includes two sculptures that have accompanying sound with text and graphic work. Each sculpture has to do with a male figure of history, the astronaut Buzz Aldrin, and the painter Barnett Newman, both from the late 60’s. The space of the gallery becomes a walk in sound collage with both sculptures’ activating the gallery with sounds emitting and overlapping. Newman and Aldrin talking over each other about their challenges, successes, and doubts.

The desert, according to the British architecture and design theorist Reyner Bahham from the late 60’s, “…is a projection surface positioning the body as a spatialization frame”, referring to the Mojave desert in CA as a true frontier. The desert has been portrayed in hundreds of Western films including films by directors John Ford and John Huston, and in such films including Michelangelo Antonioni’s Zabriskie Point.

BODYPOINT references the desert and cinema utilizing colored panels and sound that frames the “whole-body” as a critical reconsidering of the experience of sheer space. It incorporates three elements, a soundtrack, poster, and a tinted window. The looped sound component is a textural soundscape used as a soundtrack and played continuously through a freestanding PA speaker mounted on a tripod.

 

Bodypoint Soundtrack Excerpt

“Roundabout/UEBA”, a solo exhibition at STUDIO10 Gallery, Bushwick, NY, February 3-28 2012.

The exhibition Roundabout/UEBA includes two metal sculptures with accompanying sound, photography, 3d animation video, and drawings. The sculptures perform as an installation in the gallery space that allows the simultaneous sound from both sculptures to sonically blend together.

“Roundabout” incorporates the translation of data and space into abstract sound. It is comprised of a steel sculpture with an iPod mounted to it. The iPod presents a 3D animation of the same sculpture rotating from two different views at two speeds with accompanying sound. The sound from the animation is generated from uploading the elevation graphics of the sculpture to a software program that converts visual data to sound.

“UEBA” presents the idea of promise with the possibility of failure. A PA speaker mounted to the small aluminum sculpture plays an 11-disc audio book “Magnificent Desolation” by Buzz Aldrin. The disks may be played in any order or repeated as desired.  Accompanying the sculpture and audio are three portraits of Aldrin.

Werk.by is an online critical discussion forum for invited and subscribed artists,created by Andy Alexander for his exhibition at Glendale College Art Gallery. December 2011-January 2012

The discussion forum continues to be active after the show has ended.

Andy Alexander – Werk.by

Floating Points: Volume (IV) with David Schafer

Collaboration with Stephan Moore of the Issue Project Room and Volume (IV), an improvising quartet featuring electroacoustic harpist Shelley Burgon, turntablist Maria Chavez, laptop artist Stephan Moore and electroacoustic flautist Suzanne Thorpe. A space-frame structure was built, utilizing modular scaffolding, in the center of the performance space that the musicians performed inside of. The multi-channel speaker system was mounted to the outside of the frames and the entire structure/event was seen as a sculpture sited within the venue.

“LOL: A Decade of Antic Art”

June 10-September 4, 2011
Opening Reception Friday June 10, 6-9pm.

“LOL: A Decade of Antic Art” is a survey of recent artworks which either riff off or intervene on the real. “LOL” includes works by Kendall Bruns, Kahty Chen Milstead, Chto Delat?, Patrizia Giambi, Gimhongsok, Larry Hammerness, Jonathan Horowitz, Katie Kehoe, Nina Katchadourian, Larry Krone, Jennifer Levonian, Ryan Mulligan, My Barbarian, Dan Perjovschi/Nedko Solakov, William Powhida, Rob Pruitt, David Schafer, Alysse Stepanian/Philip Mantione, Joey Versoza and the Yes Men!

A short review in the Baltimore Sun is included here.

Three pieces were included in this show. “Untitled Expression: Classroom Excercises” and “Untitled Expression: The Enunciation Lecture” were shown together in one space.

The front window of the museum was used to display the installation, “Richard Serra: The Signature Series”. The third piece, which will be screened at a local theater is a video titled “Choreography for Mime: Making a Sculpture”.

The book, published and distributed by Charta Art Books and designed by artist Mitchell Kane, chronicles the concept and fabrication process of creating the commissioned sculpture “Separated United Forms”. Numerous pictures and technical captions are included throughout the pages, from scanning the Henry Moore sculpture to its digital form, models, and the final placement and installation of the bronze forms. Also included is an essay by myself, and by critic Jan Tumlir.

Amazon review by Jenn Joy, lecturer and sculpture faculty, Rhode Island School of Design:

David Schafer’s Separated United Forms (2010) is a book that you want to touch. It feels less like a document and closer to a supplementary object, a slick matte container for various mediations on the titular site-specific sculpture, its processes, and provocations.
The overall designs draws on slick digitized graphics of architectural renderings to emphasize the series of scale shift between the source sculpture–Henry Moore’s Reclining Form– and Schafer’s Separated United Forms, between SUF and the immediate hospital architecture, between architecture and surrounding space. My reading then participates in this scanning and sampling as I must hold multiple ideas of scale and site simultaneously.

Schafer’s essay, “Where does it Hurt?” offers a genealogy for the work, one that is as much art historical as it is material and social. Tracing connections between medical and archival techniques, he details the processes–scanning, processing, composing, fabricating–that translate or perhaps even deform Moore’s form in order reform it. For me, SUF offers a provocative explication of the subtle humor of gesture as a way of attending to and restaging moments from art history all under the shadow of the medical community and art museum. And this humor is always a spatial, corporeal and conceptual thing. Is it possible he asks to reactivate Vitalist life form or psychic energetics through scanning? What other fictions are hidden within?

As in response, Jan Tumlir structures his essay around the refrain “What is it?” Is it alien or blob or abstract or analytic? Where does it come from? And what has it been reading along the way? As if in response to the densely citational work of SUF, Tumlir offers the reader a series of parallel trajectories for engagement rather than considering Schafer’s genealogies in depth. At times, his writing seems anxious to avoid any statement that might seem conclusive or over-describe the work as if that might limit it my reading of SUF. And it is a great compliment to the work itself, that it generates these possibilities.